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The history of yurts.
And the physics of it.

Why did the Mongolians
build a circular home?

The Great Steppe stretches across Mongolia, Russia, Ukraine, China, Kazakhstan and a few other -stans — 6.5 million sqkm. of plain grasslands with no trees or other features to break the wind. Any structure here, on these open steppes, had to resist the wind. And that is why the Mongolians came up with the round yurt.

That besides, the Mongols were nomadic herdsmen. They needed a home they could build and dismantle quickly, built with locally available material (wood frames and animal skin).

The yurt has great cultural significance in Mongolia — it symbolises their connection to nature, community, and their ancestral heritage. They call it ‘ger’ and outside Ulaanbaatar, you will still find a ger city with thousands of yurts.

Originally
Genghis Khan’s.
Now AirBnB’s.

Genghis Khan conquered half the world (with all its fancy palaces), yet continued to live in his yurt. The Khan had a fancy yurt called a khibitkha, permanently mounted on a cart. He even marched to war in his khibitkha, hauled by a team of over 20 oxen.

It was not just war that excited Genghis Khan. When you learn that 1 in every 200 men alive today is a direct descendant of Genghis, you realise how comfortable and inspiring yurts are.

This comfort makes yurts the world’s favourite glamping solution. So popular now, that yurts are a category on AirBnB.

The history of yurts.

And the physics of it.

Why did the Mongolians dump the square for the circle?

The Great Steppe stretches across Mongolia, Russia, Ukraine, China, Kazakhstan and other -stans — 6.5 million sqkm. of plain grasslands with no trees or other features to break the wind. Any structure here, had to be streamlined. And that is why the Mongolians came up with the round yurt.

That besides, the Mongols were nomadic herdsmen. They needed a home they could build and dismantle quickly, built with locally available material (wood frames and animal skin).

The yurt has great cultural significance in Mongolia — it symbolises their connection to nature, community, and their ancestral heritage. They call it ‘ger’ and outside Ulaanbaatar, you will still find a ger city with thousands of yurts.

Originally
Genghis Khan’s.
Now AirBnB’s.

Genghis Khan conquered half the world (with all its fancy palaces), yet continued to live in his yurt. The Khan had a fancy yurt called a khibitkha, permanently mounted on a cart. He even marched to war in his khibitkha, hauled by a team of over 20 oxen.

It was not just war that excited Genghis Khan. When you learn that 1 in every 200 men alive today is a direct descendant of Genghis, you realise how comfortable and inspiring yurts are.

This comfort makes yurts the world’s favourite glamping solution. So popular now, that yurts are a category on AirBnB.

We borrowed
a good idea.
And added
more goodies.

The Out Factory yurts borrow the original principle of the Mongolian yurts. But to that, we added glamour and luxury. And of course, we have worked really hard to make our yurts safer and weather-proof. (Had we done this in Genghis’s time, the number of his descendants would have been higher.)

96
Precision parts

13
Finishing materials

33
Handcrafted processes

We borrowed
a good idea.
And added
more goodies.

The Out Factory yurts borrow the original principle of the Mongolian yurts. But to that, we added glamour and luxury.
And of course, we have worked really hard to make our yurts safer and weather-proof. (Had we done this in Genghis’s time, the number of his descendants would have been higher.)

96 precision parts

13 finishing materials

33 handcrafted process

A Mongolian idea.
Canadian wood.
French fabric.
Indian ingenuity.
Truly global chill.

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The Out Factory Yurts?